In the Trayvon Martin case, a search for justice and unity


From what I'm seeing online, discussion about the case of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed black teen shot to death in Florida, is degenerating into a lot of angry shouting and stereotyping. It's sad to see this happening on top of the tragedy that's already taken place. As I think NRO's Robert VerBruggen and UrbanFaith's Andrew Wilkes demonstrate, each in his own way, the search for justice in this case is something that should unite us, not divide us.

Comments:

Was it Popeye who used to say "Now ain't THAT a revoltin' development!"?

If anyone had planned to re-sell their hoodie, they should hurry and get it done before prices crash.
It's possible we will never know exactly how the physical encounter itself went down, so people need to cool it with some of the accusations.

What's clear, however, is that Zimmerman's actions that initiated the whole thing went far beyond what's acceptable. I saw a coauthor of the Stand Your Ground law on CNN, saying that his law in no way justifies the pursuit that took place. Given that, and the fact that Zimmerman's inappropriate conduct led to a person's death, it is difficult to understand how some sort of charge isn't in order. Let a grand jury sort that out.

And now, due to the strange inaction of local law enforcement, here come the feds with a hate crime investigation. Wonderful.
Beyond the pale of hate crime...
http://fox4kc.com/2012/02/28/boy-set-on-fire-by-teens-in-east-side-neighborhood/


http://www.kctv5.com/story/17048649/teens-set-13-year-old-student-on-fire

http://www.kmbc.com/r/30572405/detail.html

http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/03/was_boy_in_kc_fire_attack_a_victim_of_his_schools_racist_teaching.html

The discussion of this case... degenerated into silence.




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