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Perspectives
Psalm 90, Part 2 - We Are But a Dream


According to Moses in Psalm 90, the brevity of our lives when compared with God’s unending life is due to sin. Our lives, therefore, only have eternal meaning when we allow God to teach us to number our days.

Sin creates within us self-centeredness, idolatry of our self, and delusions that our lives will have no end. We often learn of our own mortality when we encounter a trauma that threatens our lives; this trauma might involve illness, an accident, or an incident in which we face death head-on.

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Psalm 90, Part 1 - A Prayer of Moses: A Petition to Learn How to Number our Days


Few can answer these questions: “What were the lives of our ancestors like seven generations in the past? Do we know what they looked like? What their personalities were like? What their aspirations were? What their accomplishments and failures were? Do we even know where they lived and who their children were?” Some who have done genealogical research might be able to answer a couple of these questions, but in the main, most of us cannot answer even one.

And so it will be with us when our ancestors are seven generations hence.

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Antichrist and the State


Interpreting the Book of Revelation
Whenever you venture into the Book of Revelation, you are asking for trouble. Some people are completely convinced that it maps out future history in detail and that we can see this played out in the daily news; others, a minority, believe that everything in the book was fulfilled in the first century. Still others avoid Revelation altogether because it’s just too difficult to understand.

My purpose here is not to go into a detailed discussion of Revelation and how to interpret it. It is admittedly difficult, in large part because it is an apocalypse, a type of literature that we no longer have today. As a result, we don’t have an understanding of how to read the text from our own cultural experience.

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Psalm 51, Our Response to Heart-Felt Restoration


David’s confession of sin and his subsequent request for restoration in Psalm 51 teach us that heart-felt confession must lead us to a heart-felt response when God restores us to fellowship with Him.

Up to now in Psalm 51...
In the last article in our examination of Psalm 51 we presented these definitions of “restoration.” The Oxford English Dictionary offers its primary definition as: The reinstatement of man in the divine favor...And its secondary definition as: The restoration of a person to a former status or position. The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery states that restoration denotes giving or receiving something back that was taken or lost.

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Psalm 51, the Request for Heart-felt Restoration


Tissot_Nathan_Rebukes_DavidAs we mentioned in the last two articles in this series on confessional prayer, confession is often the first step that leads to opening the doors to the “rooms” of reconciliation and restoration. We also pointed out that David’s Psalm 51 consists of two main sections. We discussed the first section, David’s confession of his sin that appears in verses 1-9 in the previous two articles, and now in the next two articles we will discuss David’s prayer for restoration in verses 10-19. It is this request for reconciliation after one’s confession that enables one to pass through the threshold and enter these “rooms” themselves—provided one is invited to do so.

The Oxford English Dictionary offers its primary definition of “restoration” as: The reinstatement of man in the divine favor...Its secondary definition follows: The restoration of a person to a former status or position. The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery states that restoration denotes giving or receiving something back that was taken or lost.

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The Roots of the SCOTUS Decision on Same-Sex Marriage


scotus1In Why You Think the Way You Do, I argued that cultures have worldviews just like people do. When a new worldview is adopted it takes time for it to work its way through the culture, as older ideas continue to hold within the culture for a time until the logical ramifications of the new worldview have a chance to develop and spread. Further, if the worldview is dominant for long enough, the culture will eventually adopt all of the logical implications of the worldview even if those were not apparent when the worldview was first adopted.

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