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Monday, August 18, 2014
Re: Series
John Stonestreet

Earlier in 2014 John Stonestreet did a five-part Re:Series he called “In His Image.” Part 2, called “We Are What We ___: God’s Anthropology,” John takes up how we define ourselves. Culture says, you are what you eat/wear/earn, etc. But the essence of humanity is our creation in God’s image. This image, according to the first chapter of the Bible, means that mankind is to rule over God’s creation by having offspring, and by stewarding that creation. Thus our value is intrinsic—not given by any external factor, not by ourselves or other humans, but by God Himself.

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Worldview Bible
T. M. Moore

Stephen’s death in Acts 7 releases a torrent of hostility against the church, we read in Acts 8. In this week’s Worldview Bible, we see how the pattern of the Gospel—launch/establish/disperse/reproduce—repeats. Luke, the author of Acts, gives both individual as well as broad brush pictures of how the Gospel takes hold. For a shaman named Simon and a eunuch from Ethiopia, complete life alteration. For Samaria, hated by “real” Jews of the first century, a kind of Pentecost experience of its own as the message about Jesus is brought by believers fleeing persecution in Jerusalem.

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Perspectives
Glenn Sunshine

Glenn features another brilliant but nearly unknown individual in his Perspectives series on “Christians Who Changed Their World”—this time, on an African Christian named James Emman Kwegyir Aggrey. Converted to Christianity around age 8, Aggrey soon proved to be so brilliant that he ended up receiving the bulk of his education in America. Aggrey’s field of focus became education itself, a focus solidly informed by his faith. He believed that education should involve “heart” and “hands” as well as “head.” He spent enormous time and energy both in America and Africa working for the education of Africans, both men and women, on both continents.

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InDepth
Robert Lynn

As we continue our repeat of an InDepth series called “In All The Scriptures: Reading the Bible Missionally,” we look at the second, “Getting the Big Picture.” For many Christians, we use the Bible mainly as a devotional tool: what does God want to say to me; what do I need to know, or do, or change; how can I see circumstances differently, and on and on. In other words, it’s about Me. But as Bob points out, the Bible is mostly about God and His mission to the world—and that’s what needs to be the lens through which we read and study the Bible.

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InDepth
David Sincerbox

One of the grand themes of the Bible is Wisdom. It’s a quality of spiritual life that we seek, search for ardently, prize above almost all else, points to Christ Himself. So how do we get wisdom? Fear God, says David in one of his columns from InDepth called “Wisdom and the Fear of God.” Now fear, of course is a word laden with possibly negative associations. So, fearing God must begin with understanding who God is as the Bible reveals Him: holy, awesome, worthy, majestic. If you begin grasp these, you’ll begin to understand the fear of the Lord. And you’ll gain wisdom.

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ViewPoint
T. M. Moore

How would you rate the health of your church? The church in America? Not so good, says T. M. in this week’s ViewPoint study. We’re in need of the same self-examination Paul exhorted upon the church in Corinth: we tend to be self-serving, weak in faith, immature, full of divisions and scandals, unloving. Instead we need to grab hold of God’s grace so that, like that ancient church did in response to Paul’s letters, we can exercise a healthy self-watch, attend to our teaching, use our spiritual gifts, do the work of evangelism, and serve our world as they did—and have the same impact.

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Colson Files
Chuck Colson

Chuck didn’t always speak about politics, or culture, or even (directly) about worldview. In a Breakpoint commentary from 2012, he reviewed a biography of G. K. Chesterton called Defiant Joy: The Remarkable Life & Impact of G. K. Chesterton. Like Colson, Chesterton was an apologist for Christianity in his time. But he also lived the faith in a way that outsiders found attractive. For in a polarized society—his like ours—humor and joy go a long way toward lowering the temperature and showing Christ’s love. Read or listen to Chuck’s broadcast called “Defiant Joy: Why We Still Need Chesterton.”

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http://www.colsoncenter.org/the-center/columns/worldview/20714-the-word-made-flesh-why-our-words-matter-to-god-11

About the Journal

The Christian Worldview Journal is a significant part of the Colson Center's content program. Journal articles help you develop a powerful foundation in understanding culture in the light of Scripture and historic Christian worldview. More importantly, Journal readings can help you develop your spirutal life and Christian discipleship.