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"For many transhumanists, one of the limitations to be overcome is death; these so-called immortalists point to a number of organisms, including jellyfish, lobsters, and tortoises, as evidence of the possibility of extending all life, including and especially human life. Inspiring children to embrace this possibility and to strive toward its execution is the point of Stolyarov’s book. He has even launched an Indiegogo campaign to distribute Death Is Wrong to 1,000 children free of charge."

Read more: Marybeth Davis Baggett, Christ & Pop Culture
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"Why can’t these people just let children read and enjoy books that appeal to them? If my kids read good books, I don’t care if the books are 'boy books' or 'girl books.'"

Read more: Rod Dreher, The American Conservative
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"When my wife and I had our first daughter, we weren’t sure we’d ever be allowed to share that joy with her. A traumatic brain injury during birth indicated that she might never be able to enjoy the sound of language or the thrill of a story. And besides, those first few brutalizing years left us thinking about little else besides keeping each other alive.

"But we kept reading to her, even when it felt like we were just reading to ourselves."

Read more: Ron Charles, The Style Blog, The Washington Post
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"Throughout history, fairy tales have provided stable ground, a comforting picture of a world where morality matters. These stories give us glimpses of truth in a society that often distorts right and wrong."

Read more: Katherine Reay, Her.meneutics, Christianity Today

(H/T Rachel McMillan)
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"But despite the flaws and the film's occasional sentimental lapse, The Book Thief is hardly meaningless. It powerfully portrays one dimension of the Christian story: the glory of humanity."

Read more: Jen Pollock Michel, Her.meneutics, Christianity Today
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"Shelter your children. Yes. Absolutely. But use a picnic shelter, not a lightless bomb bunker, and not virtual reality goggles looping bubblegum clouds. Feast with them on fiction in safety, laugh with them through terrible adventures seething with real weather. They should feel the wind and fear the lightning and witness the fools and heroes—and yet stay protected."

Read more: N. D. Wilson, Mud Alive, Christianity Today
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"Young-adult fiction, commonly called 'YA fiction,' has exploded over the past decade or so: The number of YA titles published grew more than 120 percent between 2002 and 2012, and other estimates say that between 1997 and 2009, that figure was closer to 900 percent. Ask a handful of young-adult fiction writers what exactly makes a YA novel, though, and you’ll get a handful of conflicting answers."

Read more: Nolan Feeney, The Atlantic
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"The more I think about the world of Divergent, the more bothered I get by the way courage is presented. I’ve got other problems with the worldbuilding, but I’m going to focus just on this question for the moment. What is courage, and what is fear?"

Read more: Mary Johnson, Exploring the Inner Universe

(See also "Courage in YA literature, part 2: integrity")
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"Here are my top five signs you’re reading too much young adult literature."

Read more: Brenna Clarke Gray, Book Riot
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"So what better time to look at the original golden age of YA literature? Author — and occasional NPR reviewer — Lizzie Skurnick has written for and about teens, and now she's starting her own imprint, dedicated to publishing beloved and forgotten YA books from the 1930s through the 1980s — including, let's be truthful, some that made me squeal with excitement when I saw them on her bookshelf."

Read more: Petra Mayer, NPR Books, NPR
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"Giving students some choice in what they read, as Ross suggests, can really help grease the reading wheels for students, but we needn’t abandon more formalized classroom activities to aid their enjoyment of books -- even assigned books. My own experience tells me that some students will love the readings I assign, some will tolerate them, and some with actively loathe them. Hand any 30 people the same book and you’ll likely get similar results. What often shapes a student’s reading experience with an assigned book has less to do with how much he adored what he read and more to do with the teacher’s approach to the book in the classroom. If a student feels that his response to the book is what’s valued and he’s given a chance to work through that response a less restrictive way, he will likely come away appreciative of, if not in love with, the given book, even if there is an essay to write or a quiz to take along the way."

Read more: Josh Corman, Book Riot
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"Responding to reports of a nascent boycott against the upcoming movie version of his beloved 1985 sci-fi novel Ender’s Game because of his stated opposition to same-sex marriage, author Orson Scott Card has released a statement exclusively to EW. He declares the gay-marriage issue 'moot' due to last month’s Supreme Court rulings. He also makes a plea for gay-marriage supporters to 'show tolerance toward those who disagreed with them when the issue was still in dispute.'"

Read more: Grady Smith, Inside Movies, Entertainment Weekly
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"Year after year, generation after generation, every time a good coming-of-age novel is written, someone somewhere compares it to Salinger's tour de force. Why exactly is it that reviewers so often name-check the book about the aimless, ambling adventures of a kid who's just been kicked out of Pencey Prep when discussing stories about growing up?"

Read more: Maura Kelly, The Atlantic
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"Young Adult [winner]: Child of the Mountains by Marilyn Sue Shank (Delacorte Press, a division of Random House)"

Read more: Wynnwynn Media
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"A group of sixth-grade literacy students at Thomas Jefferson Middle School learned what it takes to convert the written word into a movie with the premier of 'The Last Thing I Remember,' a movie they made themselves based on the novel of the same name by author Andrew Klavan."

Read more: Kris Hilgedick, (Jefferson City, Mo.) News Tribune
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"The point isn't to create a single perfect role model, be it Merida or Wonder Woman or Cimorene or Cinderella. The point is to give girls, and for that matter boys, the chance to see femininity not solely as a prison to inhabit or escape, but as a story that can be told in lots of ways."

Read more: Noah Berlatsky, The Atlantic
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"On June 7, Tiger Eyes, based on the 1981 best-seller about a young woman mourning her father’s death, will be released on demand and iTunes, and in select -theaters. Blume co-wrote the screenplay with her son, Lawrence Blume, who directed the film, but getting it to the screen wasn’t easy—surprising, given Hollywood’s current obsession with all things YA."

Read more: Sara Vilkomerson, Shelf Life, Entertainment Weekly
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"Rereading all four of these books this week reminded me how much I love Konigsburg in particular and I love younger-than young adult books. Once plots start being driven by romance, the complications get a lot more boring and more of the plot is driven by people just not being direct with each other. There aren’t any serious romances in any of the Konigsburg books, but the protagonists['] lives are hardly dull. Since there’s not as much rumination and moping, there’s a lot more creativity and collaboration. Each of these books is a pleasure to read at any age."

Read more: Leah Libresco, Unequally Yoked, Patheos
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"In honor of Konigsburg’s work, here’s a slideshow of seven books about the places that kids escape to in books—some real and tangible like the Met, others pure fantasy."

Read more: Nick Davies, Melville House
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"Forty-odd years before Ben Stiller spent a night at the museum, Claudia Kincaid did it first, at the Met, with her kid brother Jamie, in 'From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.' E.L. Konigsburg, who wrote that book, died on Friday in Falls Church, Va. at age 83. She wrote 20 other books and won two Newbery Medals (and one Newbery Honor — in 1968 she lost to herself), but Claudia was her ur-heroine, the gloriously competent 12-year-old who orchestrated the most fantastical run-away: sleeping in historic beds, scrounging for money in fountains, skulking in bathrooms to avoid security guards."

Read more: Monica Hesse, The Style Blog, Washington Post
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See all articles in the archive.


Note: A link on this page does not constitute an endorsement from BreakPoint. It simply means that we thought that the linked news item or opinion piece would be of interest to Christian parents of teens and preteens.